Thinking of doing DMX Stage Lighting through C3 - best practice?


#81

Hi, Corky

With DMXIS on board, you’ll be able to use the power of Cantabile bindings or sequence or note driven changes to select different cues in a DMXIS show. As you do not use backing tracks, then the options would be to trigger from keyboard notes, or foot pedals (generating a CC).

In Welsh Floyd, I used to do the following

  • Sequenced changes against our backing tracks - brilliant as you can do tempo locked cues that a light man could never do that tightly in time with the music!
  • Manual changes from a MIDI CC generated from my FC300 foot pedal for free form changes. Such as the intro of “Shine On” (in this case you can just map a single CC in DMXIS to advance cues)
  • Changes triggered by keys on the keyboard. For example in “Run Like Hell” which we used to do unclicked (until we got fed up of the drummer always going out of time with the guitar delay!), then I played the synth bass note with my left hand, so had light cues triggered from that, as well as some general cues I could hit on keys not playing sounds, for the intro and endings where I was not playing the bass notes.

Plenty of choices with DMXIS and Cantabile as a combination! :slight_smile:


#82

Thanks again Derek.

Yes I’ve noticed from the large discussion above. I was taking your cue on my future setup with state changes and MIDI CC.

I actually had that happen this weekend with the same song! The drummer stopped listening and decided it needed to be faster. I told him the delay was the virtual “click track” which he despises. :laughing:


#83

It is a rare drummer who can stay at a rock steady tempo from start to finish (no criticism intended). As they go into fills and come out of them faster, and so the tempo starts to creep up.

At least in Welsh Floyd we had a drummer happy to play to clicks, but we had never got around to doing that song until we got fed up. Pete, guitars, used to get so pissed off, as there comes a time where if the drums are going to fast then the delay effect just becomes a mush. Peter would look at the drummer, and wave his guitar at the right tempo, but it was always ignored. So we clicked it on the excuse that I could do (and did do) a better light show and we added in the centre section sound effects, and via the drummer’s drum pad, I gave him a sample in Cantabile for the end cannon effect, which he loved!

The arguments of drummers not liking playing to a metronome and losing all the feel is non argument to me for two reasons.

  1. I have to play in time to a drummer, so why can a drummer not play in time to a reference?
  2. With careful programming you can put in tempo changes in a click track where you need them and still have a natural feel.

Sure it stops some spontaneity on solos, but sometimes that aint a bad thing. We probably have all had experiences where you want to stop the song, but somebody won’t. Funnily enough the worst I ever had was the drummer in my Echoes band. We were doing Comfortably Numb and it had even gotten to the point where even the guitar player wanted to stop! But the drummer (who had started the song too fast) was like the Duracell Bunny. He just went on and on and on (lost in the moment I guess), and he was looking into the corner of a very cramped stage, not looking at the rest of us. I think the singer threw his percussion eggs at him in the end to get his attention!


#84

I had a High School band director who would throw his baton, wooden end first, at anyone nodding off. He became deadly accurate.


#85

Corky

I’m not certain whether we had the same band directory, or if ALL band directors do this.

Actually my band director used a broken drum stick and always used to throw the sharp end at students. He was an absolute ass, which I realized even more 10 years after high school when I ran into him at my optometrists office. I knew he was an ass, but I don’t think the Dr did (old family friend, schoolmate of my brother) until that day.


#86

Unless you were in an Arkansas High School fifty years ago, I doubt it. Although, most band directors I have encountered were asses. Strangely enough, after completing my 1st degree, I was bombarded by school administrators looking for a band director. I was never enticed to enter that “club” of wanna-be fraternity party boys. It was amazing how they bullied students and got away with it.


#87

Umm, I’ve been a band director for 25 years and am not like that. Actually, that type of behavior would not only get you fired now, but no one would take your class. Students have a lot of choices for electives - languages, yearbook, student government, robotics, and would drop my class in a second if I threw something at them. I am certainly not a wanna be party boy as I type this at 6 am in the morning.


#88

Hi Paul

Not a slam to you, or others because I know this doesn’t happen in today’s world. Fifty years ago was quite a different time. We were treated like college freshmen in middle school. Because I was studying music, I was around many band directors, and it was truly a practice most of them embraced. I knew band directors who dated their students…in high school. Even Professors in college were that way. I have never been cursed at as badly as I was by my college director of music, in front of 120 fellow music students, using a megaphone. This happened to most every student. It was demeaning and demoralizing, and I tried in vain to change my major, but the school would not allow it. This was the time of approved hazing, and it just worked it’s way from the Universities to the high schools. The upperclassmen reveled in the practice. Being a freshman was torture, in high school as well as college. I was surrounded by upperclassmen outside the band room in high school, stood at attention (like we in the military) and was punched in the face several times, until I lost it. I bent the hell out of my trumpet when I swung it at head of one of them…he lost a couple of teeth out of his dislocated jaw. Fortunately my Dad stepped in and chewed the band director and the school out. Nothing happened to anyone, but it was toned down for awhile. Thank goodness things have changed.

My passion for music carried me through those times and on to higher degrees, but I didn’t teach until later in life because I couldn’t find it within myself to conform to a system I totally disagreed with. My apologies to the OP for the unrelated rant. And Paul, I am sure you are a great teacher…it would have been a much better experience having someone as yourself at the helm in those days.

Regards

Corky